Category Archives: Club News

President’s column December 2019

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays, dear Abbotsford flying club members!  Well, this will be my last column of the decade, ha ha!  There are many things to look forward to this month, you can sign up for a pool tourney in the New Year, there are a myriad of Christmas parties and events, including our very own special Christmas edition of the TGIF and I’m personally looking forward very much to Lise Ash’s presentation on her Give Hope Wings flight.  Her Northern escapade embodies the spirit of adventure and exploration that are at the very core of aviation and kindles the heart of every pilot.AFC President Seal

As I look forward to 2020 I think to myself – it’s got to be a sign!  20/20 means perfect vision and I want this to be something we work on this year.  With Abbotsford airport developing quickly around us, it is important that we know who we are.  What is important to us?  What do we value?  Who do we want to be in the future?  These are things that we consider as a first step to develop our Strategic Plan.  We have set up the Board so that we can focus as a leadership team on working with all members to develop our plan.  Here are the basic, progressive steps for developing a comprehensive Asset Management Plan.

  1. Identify our Club Values
  2. Set up a Club Policy – you may know these as a Vision and a Mission – based on values
  3. Identify Club Assets – what are the things we use to derive value? For example, our aircraft, our building, our limited partnership.
  4. Evaluate each asset for value delivered – what do we get out of it and what does it cost?
  5. Align the value delivered with the policy – Is it delivering what we actually want to have at an acceptable cost?
  6. Set the strategy for each asset using the above
  7. Based on all of the above, a “strategic plan” can be created for all of our present and future assets.

There’s a lot to absorb, here, but we’ll go through what these activities are and what they mean at a future planning session.  At our January meeting I’d like to take some time to work with you to get an idea of our values.  We are setting up an online area for your input – we would like to hear from you.  What makes the club worthwhile for you?  How can we do more to get more of those valuable experiences, relationships or opportunities?

Above all, I hope that you have a good time this month – but also remember to stay safe.  Please remember to have alternate transportation or a designated driver if you are going to drink.  The slip and trip season is officially started so please walk carefully and wear footwear appropriate to the season.  And remember: if the weather is marginal, consider that you have the rest of your life to fly so you needn’t take an unnecessary risk today.

May you all enjoy a joyous and mirthful holiday and I hope to see you all soon!

Yours truly,
George

Laying the foundation for the John Spronk Memorial Bench

On Friday November 29 Chris Palmer brought the rental concrete mixer to the club at 0900 hrs. Under leadership of Lorenzo and the assistance of Murray and Duncan, bag after bag of premix was poured into the mixer and with the added water, poured into the form. Lorenzo estimated they would need 25 bags of premix, when in fact they used 24 bags. In less than 90 minutes the project was completed. After setting for a few hours, Lorenzo put the finishing touch on the surface with a broom. It looks great. It is covered up and they have a little heater going to make sure the concrete cures properly.

Abbotsford Remembrance Day Flypast

Here we are over Victory Square in Abbotsford.

Lead  aircraft is Adrian in the club’s Cessna 172, right wing is Gerry Crapo flying the Glastar and left wing is Bevan Tomm in his RV7A.

Following close behind but not in same formation were former members Rene Robertson in his Piper Pacer and Dave Wall in his Quickie Q2

Thanks to Heather for the photo and big thanks to the participating pilots

AFC Pig Roast and Luau 2019

The AFC pig roast was held Saturday September 21

Lorenzo and Murray hard at work

Chef Lorenzo started the charcoals at 10am. The porker was done to perfection by 5:30

Murray prepping more BBQ pork!

We had about 60 people in attendance and most were decked out in Hawaiian shirts and leis.

Needs some beer!

We charged a $10 per head fee to cover costs of the whole pig, briquettes,

Almost done!

Caesar salad,buns,baked beans and some decorations.

Expert carving at work

People were also asked to bring an appy or dish or dessert .

Luau lineup

They stepped up big time with an amazing assortment of Luau inspired dishes.

Luau lineup

Ken Campbell brought his blender and concocted delicious and healthy tropical fruit smoothies. (OK- they were pina-coladas )

Thank you to everyone who pitched in to make this a great event.: Cheryl, Jan,Jeanette, Leanne, Lorenzo and many more.

Cheers, Murray

Celebrating $250,000 raised and 1000 medical flights for Hope Air¹s Give Hope Wings 3 week NW Expedition

Thank you family and friends, YOU helped get this DONE!

Asking people to give towards a cause they may not be familiar with, and who already give so much, to open up their pocketbooks, and give again for something that is on our radar, is pushing my comfort limit.

BUT……YOU……all said yes to helping this Canadian NGO, Hope Air, help Canadians fly to their medical appointments & treatments who are from rural areas.

I am so thankful to have met a few of these courageous individuals on this trip who have used Hope Air in their times of need. Many of them would not have gone through with their treatments had they not been able to fly to and from their faraway homes.

I’ve been blessed to have expanded my wings….literally…on this Adventure, and want to thank all those cheering leaders who said yes, you can do this Lise. It was really a “personal best” for me!

Photo credits to Bob Leroux, fellow aviator and friend from the Abbotsford Flying Club.

Bob & his wife Val, came out to capture Hope Air’s GHW in Pitt Meadows both on June 2nd and upon our memorable return July 5th. Thank you Bob.

Airport Day June 2nd

  • Dave McElroy: Chief Pilot Wings 1 RV6 & Coordinator of 2019 NW Expedition
  • Rani Tolton: GHW Volunteer Flight Crew, Leg One
  • Steven Drinkwater: Wings 3, Chief Pilot C140
  • Lise Ash: Title Sponsor & PIC Wings 1 RV6
  • Ian Porter: Wings 2, Chief Pilot Pipistrel Virus

My total gear for 3 weeks away. No high heels in this packing job.

Title Sponsor Langley Sportsplex

 My rudder extensions, a full 5 1/2”

My family, cheering leaders, send off and welcoming committee.

Quilt on the arrival back.

1st picture taken by Bob as Dave slid back the canopy and we officially completed the mission safe & sound at 3:10 pm July 5th.

Cheering Leaders!

Thank YOU again.

I am working on a short Power Point presentation highlighting some key moments, so watch for it coming soon.

Preparing the Fly In Camping Area

On Saturday July 13 Ed Boon, Tom Grozier, Ruth Wiebe and Adrian gathered in the AFC lounge for coffee and muffins, supplied by Ruth.

After that we met Steve Stewart and got onto the airfield east of Sequoia Helicopters. This is the area for the new home of aircraft parking this year.

Ed, Steve and I marked the low spots on the field with cones and Tom with his John Deere dug into the pile of crush dust, supplied by Gerry Crapo, to dump and spread it onto the low spots. A full day of hard labour was accomplished in two hours.

Notes from our Past – 1969

Notes from our Past – 1969

1969 was an important year for aerospace, aviation, the AFC and the Airshow.

By Steve Stewart

For AFC and AIAS, the year started in January with the AFC buying-out the EAA Chapter 85 half-interest in the Airshow, which left the AFC as sole sponsor. From then on, the AFC had full responsibility for producing the show every year for almost three decades. The relationship with EAA Ch85 had started in 1964, and had worked well, but by 1968 there was serious conflict, and a parting of ways was the mutually agreed solution.

The maiden flight of the Boeing 747 was in February. This was an aircraft destined to utterly transform the business of air travel, by making it more accessible than could possibly have been imagined at that time. A 747 in Pan Am livery came to the Airshow in August that year and performed a series of low passes along runway 18-36; which would have also involved climb outs and approaches directly over Clearbrook.

A much briefer flash of achievement was the Tupolev 144, the Russian SST. It actually first flew late in 1968, but it had a series of technical problems, and a crash at the Paris Airshow in 1973; and its time in service was short. However, early in 1969 the Airshow society sent a message of congratulation to Moscow, along with an invitation to attend the show. (In fact, the Russians were invited every year from 1965 onward.) The Tu144 did not come to the show, but Mr. Vassili Myshkov, Head of the Soviet Trade Representation in Ottawa did attend, and at the Airshow Banquet on August 7 th , he presented a model of the Tu144 to the AFC and AIAS. That model is still on display over the bar in the AFC lounge.

The1969 airshow was opened on Friday August 8 th by Prime Minister P.E. Trudeau. He was scheduled to speak at 12:50, followed by a fly-past CF5 demonstration at 13:00. They came thundering in at precisely 13:00 – dead on time. Pierre was still talking and had been unaware of their near-silent approach from the west at over 400 mph. When the noise died down, he was heard to mutter “I guess I might as well shut up and sit down”.

The next display was the Boeing 747 in Pan Am livery, and it was followed by a display by two Mini- Mustangs, one red, flown by John Spronk and one black, flown by Scott Nelskog of Edmunds Wa. It resulted in the only fatality in the history of the airshow. After passing each other midfield at high speed and 50 feet altitude, both aircraft climbed out and started snap rolls to the right. Scotty was travelling south, and two thirds into the roll his nose dropped. Only instantaneous correction could have saved him. He hit the runway in a vertical dive and was killed. There were suggestions that lingering wake turbulence from the 747 had been to blame, but this possibility was dismissed by the technical investigation on the basis of compelling evidence. Scotty had a total 618 hours of flying time, including 62 hours on type, but he was relatively inexperienced with aerobatics, having only 12 hours total aerobatic time, including just three hours on type. It appeared that this was his first attempt at low-level aerobatics. The investigation concluded that “.. the pilot in all probability became momentarily confused while inverted and reversed the required control column movement
while attempting to bring the nose up during the roll.” The coroner’s report did not attach blame to any person. The DoT had asked the accident investigator if there were any problems that might be eliminated in future, and he responded with a recommendation that there was scope for more positive control of safety by requiring that pilots performing low level aerobatic manouevres at airshows should be required to demonstrate competence before a Civil Aviation Inspector.