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General Meeting Minutes – 2021-01-13

General Meeting Minutes – 2021-01-13
ABBOTSFORD FLYING CLUB
GENERAL MEETING

Members attending via Zoom teleconference 53 attendees

Guests

  • None

Presentations

Agenda:

1. Call to order.
2. Welcome to the January 13 th club meeting
3. Guest speaker: Mischa and Ruben Dias helicopter circumnavigation of the globe
4. Questions
5. Committee reports:
VP
Treasurer
Safety Committee
Aircraft Maintenance
Membership
Good and welfare
Other
6. Announcements
7. Questions
8. Next meeting: February 10th
9. Adjourn

Call to Order – 19:38

Presentation: Mischa Gelb and Reuben Dias

Committee report

  • President: Ken: Welcome to the new year, not much flying, perhaps 12 hours considering the weather. Did have an extraordinary board meeting talking about the COVID restrictions and this will continue on for the time being. Some Seminars are coming soon, PDM, weather Human Factors etc, with Warren Legrice and also COPA to support continuous learning.
  • VP: Mark: Super enjoyed their presentation and they have a book that may be worth the read. Next meeting will be Greg Reeder will speak about Mission Aviation Fellowship. March will be an F4 Phantom pilot will be Jimmy Spentzas talking about the Hellenic Airforce and flying the Phantom
  • Treasurer: Not much to report. Bills are being paid.
  • Flight Safety Committee In going forward for safety in the club education is the main topic. Warren Le Gris, if everyone has seen the email, is putting on safety seminars on Saturdays at 09:30 – 10:30. Check the dates. At the same time COPA is putting on safety seminars via zoom at 08:30 – 11:00.
    It is a strong recommendation from the safety committee that all members attend these seminars to keep your head in the game.To say that you don’t need them is like saying your personality is in Charge not Pilot in Command.
    To attend Warren’s you need to send him an email to get the code for linking up. For COPA you will have to register for that one.
    Both will be a benefit, but it is good to support our own productions.Second thing.Since the amount of CADORS the club has had and the last three we had in the fall. The safety committee is looking into a SMS and SOP’s for club operation by suggestion from TC. This will be our focus for this term.That is all for now.
    Remember your flight is only as good as your planning from start to finish.
    Safe flights all.
  • Aircraft Maintenance: Taylor: GMA had it’s Annual in December with our new AME and that went well. IUK is having an avionics issue being looked at. Any questions or concerns Taylor will stick around after the meeting.
  • Membership
    • Want to wish everyone a happy New Year on behalf of myself and the Membership Committee. I think like most we are glad 2020 is over.The Board has approved 11 applicants for membership this includes 6 returning members. Official introductions will be made at the next general meeting.
      • Skylar Pridham: Returning Member
      • Jayden Wolfe: Returning Member
      • Warren Legrice: Returning Member
      • Kyle Warkentin: Returning Member
      • Luke Peters: Returning Member
      • Brian Bartley: New Member
      • Nicholas Cooper: New Member
      • Jason Sebastian: New Member
      • Yann Mazzocchin: New Member
      • Dan Renaud: New Member
      • Dean Bryan : Returning Member

      Some new and returning members are currently still deciding on when they will officially join our club pending of course COVID-19 restrictions.

      Some new and returning members will also be featured in our newsletter. Along with photos and a small paragraph about them. This is a great way to learn a little more about them.

      The membership committee is continuing the process of interviewing new applicants and meeting regularly.

Good and Welfare of the Club

Pat Ulicki had recent surgery. Bob is on the mend.

Old Business

  • None

New Business

  • Warren:
    • First half of the sessions are being delivered starting this weekend will be this Saturday or perhaps another time will work? Stay tuned for upcoming seminars that will be announced. wlegrice@gmail.com
  • Randy Kelley:
    • Thanks to Ken for his leadership on the board and he respects that as a past-president and thanked our president and all members members of the board for their ongoing good work and their continued efforts to unite our club.
  • Tom Timm:
    • Tom asks about the recurrent training plans. Bob Leroux does indicate that the quiz in the Aviation Safety Letter does count for the two year recurrency. There are other seminars online, just have to find them.
    • Ken has asked Warren to see if some of these seminars could be approved by TC for recurrency.
    • Mark: COPA is releasing some sessions that will qualify for the 2 year, so stay tuned.
  • Luciano Nisi:
    • Question for Ken:  is there any specific plans for the club for the year with respect to COVID?
      • Ken says we are doing the best we can under the circumstances.
    • Luciano is questioning the $4000 being spent on upgrading the security system that we *just* upgraded.
      • Kevin spoke that it is a better system being offered by donation. The offer is from a club member that is better than what we have. There has been no decision yet by the board. There are more features available than what we  have at the moment.
      • Luciano asked for five quotes but only got four and walked them through. FV Alarm did not respond at the time.
    • Luciano asks if there are there any consideration for fixing the radios in GMA and it also does not have ADSB and cannot fly into the USA.
      • Ken indicates it has not yet come before the board
    • Luciano asks why club pilots can not have checkouts or instruction in club aircraft but can do so in a flying school aircraft?
      • Ken indicates we have COVID restrictions and they must be respected, otherwise we open everything up and that is not acceptable at the moment. Many members cannot fly with other members and COVID does not discriminate who is in the passenger seat.
  • Steve Stewart:
    • Steve would like to get some clarity on what’s happening with the publication of the minutes of Board meetings.We have a by-law that requires the minutes of board meetings to be shared with members before the next General Meeting.This has never caused any problems or been an issue in the past. But I believe that there is some opposition to this at the moment.For example : the Dec Board minutes were only posted to the website last night.  And that was after they had been approved by an extraordinary board meeting last night.  The same thing happened with the Nov board minutes.

      Each time, they have only been posted after there was an additional board meeting just before the GM.

      Does the Board plan to have an extraordinary meeting every month?

      What will happen if the Board doesn’t have an extra meeting?

      How will the Board ensure that its minutes do get shared with Members before the GM, as is required by our by-law?

    • Bylaw 5.21 requires the minutes to be published before the next general meeting. Steve indicates that the incorrect bylaw is being considered.
    • Ken indicates that minutes are only published once officially approved by the board at a duly constituted meeting, and that is the way it should be done.
    • Randy: Point of order: This argument needs to happen in the board meeting.

Adjourn – 21:22 by Millie

Next club general meeting:  10 February 2021 @ 19:30 via Zoom
Next scheduled Board meeting: 27 January 2021 @19:30 via Zoom

President’s Column – January 2021

In keeping with a positive theme, I am pleased to share with you good news regarding the giving spirit of the club and the generosity of our members during the Christmas season. 

Thanks to Taylor Belich for organizing a food drive, which resulted in a large amount of groceries being delivered to the Archway Food Bank.  Secondly, thanks to Adrian and Barbara Renkers for reaching out to establish a fund in which $1350 was raised, again for the Archway Food Bank.  This is a testament to the caring and generosity of our club members and a special thanks to all for the outpouring of support for our community.

COVID protocols continue to remain in effect certainly for the foreseeable future.  However, with the vaccines that are slowly becoming available we could see a return to more normal conditions sometime mid-year.  So we ask for your patience as we work through the day to day difficulties.

In order to promote safety within our club, a battery of seminars are being offered to our pilots via zoom meetings.  Take advantage of this opportunity as we are blessed to have one of our members, Warren Le Grice, leading these courses.  Contact Warren if you would like to be added to the list of invitees.  Further to these seminars, there is a wealth of information available on YouTube which can be tapped into for learning from the experiences of others.

That’s all for this month so here is wishing you all a very Happy New Year and hoping the year ahead will be filled with good health and many hours of flying enjoyment.

Ken Funk
President
Abbotsford Flying Club

President’s Column – December 2020

There is enough bad news going around these days and I think we are entitled to some positive information as we navigate our way through the hurdles placed before us.

To our pilots who are finding ways to safely get in some flying time, congratulations.  Of course, right now it is limited to flying with family members only.  However, I am optimistic that there will be better times ahead.  

There are several ways to keep in touch with our aviation community through the various “zoom” meetings being hosted by club supporters.  Wednesday Dutch Lunch and TGIF, hosted by Devin Campbell, are available to all interested parties.  IMC meetings are also a good way to stay involved and to talk about the myriad of issues relating to flight safety.  Warren Le Grice hosts these meetings and would be happy to add you to his list of regular visitors. Contact Devin if you wish to be added to the list of invitees for either of these options (messenger@webex.com).

Someone once said they manage by “walking around”.  It’s amazing what you learn by doing so.  I discovered that there is an active community in our hangars which I wish I had known when I still had my Mooney.  The amateur-built aircraft guys have a lot to share and you would learn a lot by visiting them as they engage in plying their craft.  They are there most evenings but certainly on weekends.  See what they have to offer.

I am pleased to announce that the vacant SBS hangar slip has been walled off and leased out by YXX Hangars on a 90-day notice to vacate.  We are now receiving revenue from this lease that produced nothing in the past.

That’s all for now.  In the meantime, stay safe and healthy and keep positive when it seems such a challenge these days.

Ken Funk
President
Abbotsford Flying Club

Lise Ash is Giving Hope Wings

Give Hope Wings

The idea of circumnavigating the state of Alaska, British Columbia, and the Northwest Territories in a single-engine aircraft is the last thing I imagined doing when I started working on my pilot’s licence five years ago.

The Give Hope Wings Northwest Expedition I joined was made up of eight pilots in three aircraft. We took off from Pitt Meadows on June 15th, 2019.  Over the next three-weeks we visited thirty-six remote towns and villages and raised $250,000 which funded one thousand flights for Canadian families in need.

Some of my highlights were:

  • – Virginia Falls: where we discovered waterfalls twice the height of Niagara’s.
  • – In Inuvialuktun, N.W.T.: the mayor Natasha presented each of us with an honorary Arctic Circle Certificate of Passage.
  • – Denali National Park: where we witnessed an avalanche for the first time.
  • – The day we flew out into the Bering Sea. We went as close to the Russian boarder as we

could—without causing an international incident. The snow-capped Siberian mountains were visible in the distance. Below us were two small islands, Little Diomede—in Alaska and Big Diomede—in Russia. Only 2.5 miles apart they straddle the dateline, creating a twenty-four-hour time difference.

While the expedition was an adventure it was the warm-hearted people I remember the most. In one remote outpost a radio operator shared her deep sadness over the sudden loss of her young nephew. She asked me for a hug. Deeply touched, I obliged.

Along the way we received countless words of thanks and appreciation from people who have used Hope Air’s services before. On our last night in the little town of Sandspit, on Moresby Island, a waitress wouldn’t take our money when she found out who we were and what we were doing. Her family and several friends had used Hope Air a number of times.

            All Canadians enjoy universal health care. However, many people living in remote communities cannot afford access to that care. Hope Air bridges the gap between home and hospital.

Give Hope Wings Coast to Coast 2021

Next June a fleet of fifty planes will fly across Canada—twice—and raise $1 Million as a part of the Give Hope Wings Coast to Coast Expedition. The money we raise will fund four thousand flights for families in need. This expedition will be broken up into three separate tours; Southern, Eastern, and Northern. You can fly one, or all of them, the choice is yours.

Hope Air’s services are always needed but have become especially necessary during the COVID-19 crisis. Mark your calendar and join the team now.

For more information feel free to contact me, or Hope Air directly –

https://give.hopeair.ca/campaign/give-hope-wings-canada-coast-to-coast-expedition-2021/c268173

Tailwinds,

Lise Ash

Flight into Yesterday

Club member Ken Bucholz made a “Flight into Yesterday”I was going through some old magazines of his fathers.
The articles and ads are from the December 1955 issue of Canadian
Flight magazine.

Cessna Aircraft is now producing a tricycle undercarriage version of
the 170, known as the 172, with a tail similar to the 180.
It has a “land-o-matic” gear you can drive!

The story is about a BC aviator, Albert Mah from Prince Rupert.

President’s Column – October 2020

Dear Members,   Here we are at the end of my second – and last – term as AFC President.  My thanks to all the members for your faith and support in granting me the honour of serving for two terms.  I know that at times it has seemed somewhat fractious but to anyone who would consider serving: I can tell you the strife is small beer in contrast to the rich experience and rewarding lessons of serving on the leadership team for the club.  For me, just knowing that the club is there is sufficient reward.

I’ve met some really cool people, gotten to know some members a lot better and had some really amazing experiences.  In particular, I’ve been really impressed by the women in our club this year.  Ladies, you’ve demonstrated your spirit of adventure in aviation and drive to build skills and done some wonderful volunteering.  We need more like you!

It’s just too hard to pick a single favourite experience I’ve had as your President – so here are some top ones:  The Airshow last year was amazing; I really enjoyed learning how the campground runs.  This year we had a heartwarming moment when we hosted Patricia Spronk for the dedication of the John Spronk Memorial bench.  I was especially honoured to participate in the opening of the time capsule; writing the message to go in the next capsule for 2070 was cause for a great many reflective moments for me.  Many thanks there to Steve Stewart and Millie Watson who did an incredible amount of research and, of course, Lorenzo, who helped Steve with the explorative search for the capsule.

I’d like to extend a special thank-you to the members of my Board.  Kevin, Tom Timm and I won’t be running, but the remainder of the Board members will be volunteering again.  If you have enjoyed being at the club over the last couple of years and would like to continue in the direction of “flying, friendship and fun” I would urge you to vote them in again.

To Dirk Sieber, who served as VP, it was really great getting to know you – your insight, good judgement and friendship have meant a lot to me.  To Kevin Mickelby, who served as Treasurer, we simply couldn’t have done this without you; you have my eternal thanks and that of the club – you skillfully managed to move the AFC out of the red and back into the black.  Augie Rinz, you have been a fantastic Secretary, fast, efficient, competent and you were a great help when I needed someone to bounce ideas off of.  For the Directors – Amarvir, it has been a pleasure to see you mature into the role; your care and diligence on the membership file has reaped rewards evidenced by a cohort of excellent new members – I think that no matter what endeavour you pursue you will prevail!  Luciano Nisi, you’re definitely one of the most dedicated and safety oriented people I know.  I know that we’ve sometimes had our disagreements but through it all I’ve never forgotten your good intentions and all the hard work you’ve done!  Tom Timm – your insight and sober second thought has been invaluable!  I didn’t know you well before but I’m certainly richer for serving with you; you are an extremely competent person in possession of a keen mind and a wicked dry wit!  Tom Grozier, you have always had my admiration and regard – and now it has only grown.  You’ve had a hard road in 2020 – I hope that this coming year is better; you and Kevin Mickelby are the two best Treasurers we’ll ever have.  Lastly, I’d like to thank Brian Appaswamy, although he left the Board he has shown integrity and character by continuing to maintain the club aircraft throughout some of the most hectic flying days of the year!

Safe flights and stay healthy,

George Aung Thin
President
Abbotsford Flying Club

AFC History 1967 to 1979

AFC History 1967 to 1979

By Steve Stewart

We pick up the story of the AFC in 1967.  By far the most significant event of that year was the Centennial Air Show, which was an unmitigated success in every respect. It has been fully described in our Airshow History, and it is also AFC history.  The only slightly negative thing we can find in the records concerning that show, emerged later, when EAA Ch85 asked to be part of the 1968 show. They specifically stated that they did not want to be responsible for car parking, so we can surmise that this had been one of their responsibilities in 1967, and that they were not happy with it. But, other than that minor quibble, we can only restate that the 1967 airshow was a fantastic show in every respect. It was the biggest public event of the Centennial year; it was a fully national and international event; it attracted hundreds of thousands of guests; it injected significant money into the region’s economy; and it put Abbotsford firmly on the world map of international airshows. Both the AFC and EAA took just over $6,000 from the net revenue for their own club purposes, and each re-invested $17,500 back into the airshow organization. These were huge amounts compared to the funds they previously had available.  Just over a year later the EAA would pull out of further involvement, and demand repayment of its investment. That money is what, in part, enabled creation of the EAA Northwest Fly-In, which became the Arlington Fly-in. So, although the split was acrimonious at the time, there was an ultimate good and positive result.

The airshow would continue to go from one success to another, although there were some years not as successful as others. And the continuing flow of revenue from the show was what enabled and fueled some of the developments we will look at in the AFC. But first we should consider their developing relationship.

********************

Back then, there was universal recognition that the airshow was the creature of the AFC. It was the AFC that was recognized by COPA, by AOPA, and by the federal government in 1970, as having created and developed the airshow. The legal status of the airshow was as a not-for-profit society, with its own board of directors. Those Directors were also the only Members of the society. Four things tied the AIASS to the AFC.

  • The AFC directly appointed 14 of the 28 AIASS Directors, and at times the AFC sought to instruct those Directors on what line they should take.
  • Since the departure of the EAA, the AFC was the only investor in the AIASS, and thus had a claim on all its assets.
  • The AFC was identified as the Sponsor of the AIAS. This term carried strong proprietary implications at that time. It did not mean the type of sponsor that simply provides funds in return for recognition or naming rights etc.
  • The AFC took on the entire task of producing the airshow, and was paid an agreed fee each year in return. This was termed the ‘Production Grant’.

However, the legal relationship was not really as clear as we might have hoped.  In particular, the term Sponsor was not defined.  A general consensus of opinion believed that the AIASS constitution and Bylaws could not be changed without express agreement from the AFC, although this not appear anywhere in the bylaws themselves. And there was a belief, backed up by a legal opinion obtained in 1979, that the AFC would be liable for AIASS debts. There was also concern in the AFC about who were the other 14 Directors of the AIASS, and how they were being chosen.   But for the most part these concerns were just hovering in the background, the AIASS operated as a separate entity, and issues were worked through, rather than being clinically analysed and resolved.  The only mention of the airshow in the AFC bylaws was introduced in 1969, and it required that the AFC President be one of the airshow directors appointed by the club.

There was general consensus that the success of the airshow itself was a good thing for both the AIASS and the AFC.  Right from the early days of the club there had been two reasons for wanting to put on an airshow. One reason was that it could raise funds. But the other was that everyone just wanted a show.  The financial aspects are nice, and are necessary for success, but the second reason is what really builds interest, brings out volunteers, brings in the public, and gets the local community to support the event.  This is as important now as it ever was.  Having an airshow is one of the defining characteristics of the AFC, of CYXX and of Abbotsford.

The mechanism by which the AFC benefitted financially was an agreement whereby the club was paid a Production Grant each year in return for all the volunteer hours put in to producing the show.  After the unpleasant wrangling associated with the departure of the EAA at the end of 1968, it was soon agreed to settle the amount of the grant early in the year, rather than making it a function of the show’s financial performance. That said, there were years when the show actually lost money, and the agreed production grant was a financial burden. In 1976, the AFC paid back $1,500 temporarily, to help with cash flow. From 1970 to 1974 the Production Grant was $7,000.  It was raised to $10,000 for 1975, to $12,000 for 1980, and to $17,000 in 1981, staying at that sum through 1985.  After paying the Production Grant to the AFC, the AIASS Financial Statements indicate net losses for 1971, 1976, 1977, 1981, 1984 and 1985.   But in between there were some very positive years, and by 1981 the AIASS cash equity had grown to over $250k, after having started at $35k in 1968.   The AFC never asked for a return on its initial investment.

Unlike the airshow annual net revenues, the AFC income stream from the Production Grant did not fluctuate. It was this reliable Production Grant that enabled the AFC to budget each year for what it would spend on aircraft, buildings, flying incentives, socials and community outreach. But the money did have to be earned, and every member was expected to help earn it, by volunteering their time both before and during the show.

Each year, an overall summary of how many members put in how much time, and which listed all the areas of activity and responsibility, was provided by the AFC to the AIASS, in order to support the agreed value of the Production Grant.   It could be backed up by detailed records of who had volunteered for how long, exactly when, and what they did.  This detail was used by the AFC internally, to determine eligibility for club programs such as the flying incentive.

********************

Treasurer Sandy Bazen described the financial success of the 1967 show to the AFC members in December. Almost immediately, at the January 1968 meeting, a ballot was taken regarding the purchase of an aircraft; which passed by 24 votes in favour and 11 votes against. The budget for 1968 showed an allocation of $3,500 for the purpose. Glenn Matthews chaired the acquisition committee, and eventually, once the purchase was made, the whole process was written up well in a newspaper report.  The first aircraft considered, in February, was an 85HP Champ, which would require hand swinging of the propeller. An offer was made, but did not work out.  In June, Matthews went to look at a 90HP Champ, and John Spronk went to see a J3 Cub in Vernon.  There is an unfortunate gap in the Minutes for six months, so we have no further details other than the newspaper report,  but we know the eventual upshot was the purchase of FNSC, a 1961 Cessna 150B, from Abbotsford Air Services. This was an aircraft that many members had already flown and were familiar with.  It had taken almost a year to settle on this aircraft, and it entered service with the club in January 1969. However, as President Joe McWhinney commented, it was only one aircraft, and the club’s 70 members expected to continue relying on AAS and SAS rentals for most of their flying. Aircraft ownership has been part of the AFC operation ever since the purchase of NSC.

One of the issues to be resolved was how much to charge for flying time. The solution adopted did not undercut either SAS or AAS, and it also provided cheap flying to members. Members could fly either the club’s own aircraft or rent from AAS or SAS. The club’s hourly rates were lower than either rental operator, but if a rental C150 was flown, the club paid the difference in rates, so the final price to a member was the same for all options. Quite reasonably, members were expected to take NSC, if it was available, instead of a rental C150.  This applied to all members who qualified to fly NSC. Qualification required a ride with a check pilot. In fact, there were five different rates, with the lowest rate (E) being for members who had joined before 1966, and the highest rate (A) for the newest qualifying members.  We still have the roster of who was approved to fly NSC, and at what rate, in 1969. It shows 19 pilots, 8 of whom joined before 1966 and who paid the lowest hourly rate. The rates were posted in the clubhouse, but were not recorded in the surviving paperwork.

The Flying Incentive also continued in operation, and this paid members to fly. The amounts of incentive available, how quickly it was being used, and what flights qualified, were all under constant review.  Student pilots had to have completed their first solo to be included.  It also included aircraft owners – in October 1967 it was decided that owners could claim up to 2.5 hours value back-dated to March. This was one of the first things agreed as soon as the financial success of the 1967 airshow started to become apparent. (Other decisions at that same time were to take St.John’s Ambulance people for plane rides at the club’s expense and to sponsor the Air Cadets.)  In 1967 the incentive had cost the club a total of $1,394.31 and was almost half of the total budget. For 1968 the incentive was settled at $6 per hour for up to 20 hours, and $2,150 was budgeted, from a total budget (not including the aircraft purchase) of $3,780.  Every monthly meeting included a report on how fast the incentive funds were being used up. The incentive was very generous.  In 1967 a C150 could be rented for $10/hour from AAS or $10.50 from SAS, and the club incentive reduced these numbers by $2.50.  In 1968 the C150 rental rates increased to $13 and $12, but the club incentive was increased to $6.  It is not surprising that the monthly reports often showed the incentive value being used up faster than was planned.

We don’t have a record of what the hourly rates were for NSC,  but in August 1969 the Executive noted that it was not flying as much as expected. The reason was put down to the low rates available from AAS, which were made even more affordable by the AFC flying incentive. Their response was to lower the NSC rate. They also lowered the cost of a check ride in order to encourage more members to qualify.

Unfortunately, we have no surviving minutes from Jan to Oct 1970, but at some point the club decided to buy another aircraft, and this time chose a Cessna 172.  This was FVBU, a 1966 Cessna 172H, and its purchase price was $8,750.  In December the rental rates, for new members, were noted as $15/hour for the C172 and $10 for the C150. For more established members the rates were $13.50 and $8.50.   The five rate levels had been reduced to just two. It was also noted that the C172 cost $14/hour to operate, and that NSC was not paying its way. From Nov 1970 to Oct 1971, NSC flew a total of just 100 hours, whereas VBU flew 200 hours, and as a result the decision was made to sell NSC.

During 1972 and into 1973 the club discussed purchase of another C172 and there was a motion to purchase a 1960 Cherokee 180 for $10,500, but this would have required a loan of $2,000 at 9%, and the motion was defeated.  In Jan 1973 the club was looking at another Cherokee, available for $11,123. It came to visit in March, and by April the club had bought it. This was FCBO, a 1964 PA-28-180.

The aircraft were parked outside at AAS, and in 1974 this cost $100/year for each plane. Intake plugs were not always used, and birds built nests around engines. And CBO was leaking. There was discussion about moving the aircraft indoors, and about building a four-place hangar, but nothing came of it. A similar proposal had been discussed in 1970-71, and it came up again in 1975.

Aircraft repairs and maintenance had become a significant item in the budget ($5,991 in 1975). The aircraft cost significantly more to operate than was collected in rental receipts (shortfall of $2,840 in 1975).  This probably contributed to the scaling back of the total value of the flying incentive.  However, the club had more than enough money coming in from the airshow. In 1975 the production grant was $10,000 and the club also netted $1,653 from film sales; membership dues only contributed $2,376 to the club’s total income. Aircraft maintenance, radio equipment, and the flying incentive were the large expenses in the budget, with clubhouse, lease and other costs being much lower.

One aircraft ownership opportunity, that the club declined, was an offer from Conair in 1976 to sell a Cessna 337 Bird Dog to the club for $30k and then lease it back for two months in summer for $6k.

In January 1977 a discussion was held regarding the idea of buying a third aircraft, but members agreed that they preferred that the money be spent to provide more subsidy to two aircraft.

Later in 1977 there was renewed discussion on upgrading the aircraft, and in September, $10k per aircraft was voted for this purpose.  But in fact VBU was replaced instead of being upgraded. It was sold to club member Lucky Hooieveid. VBU’s replacement was GHXT, a 1975 Cessna 172M, which the club would keep until December 2015. It was purchased for $10,750 plus taxes.

Early in 1978, CBO was also replaced, by GIEV, a 1976 Piper PA-28-151.  And in May the executive voted a flat rate of $20/hour for aircraft rentals (HXT and IEV), regardless of membership term.

The flying incentive had changed every year, and its continuation was always subject to a definite decision at the start of each year. In the early years it was often targeted at specific fly-outs, and qualifying pilots were expected to take other members with them as passengers. As time went by, it became a more general way to simply subsidise members’ flying. At one point it applied to rentals from any source, but was usually limited to just AAS and SAS. SAS closed its training operation at Abbotsford in 1969, so only AAS was involved for some years, but applicability was extended to Coastal Pacific Aviation when they started as a flight training centre.  While it existed, the funds budgeted each year were significant, but they did fluctuate. There is no mention of the flying incentive in the minutes or financial statements from 1976, or from later years.  The executive had discussed its discontinuation back in May of 1975, and made the decision in October, but do we do not have an explanation for why it was discontinued. We might surmise that the club had decided to focus its flying subsidies onto the club’s own aircraft rather than facilitating members to fly rental aircraft.  However, one thing that did continue as club policy for many years, did still facilitate rentals from AAS and CPA. When the club’s own aircraft were already in use, members could rent equivalent aircraft, and the club would pay the difference between the rental hourly rate and the club’s hourly rate.

All the aircraft accounting was not a trivial task, and from 1974 it came with the compensation of one hour per month free flying. There was a suggestion that other jobs might attract similar compensation. An interesting aside is that until 1968 the President had received an honorarium of $50 each year, but this was discontinued from 1969 on.

The club’s aircraft were not always used responsibly.  In 1970 a member was disciplined for flying NSC with a passenger in the right seat, plus two kids somehow standing in the back.   In 1973 it was noted that some members were using VBU for hire, and that this was illegal. This concern was minuted again in 1979. Also in 1973, a member was expelled after a long executive discussion regarding his use of club aircraft.

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Another major development in 1968 was that the club acquired the building which would become its permanent home, so far. This was the old firehall, the first building completed when RCAF Abbotsford was built during the war. It had not been used as the firehall for some years. The big doors in the east wall were boarded over and a lean-to extension had been added along that wall. But the garage space was still used as a garage, with access for smaller vehicles via doors in the north wall.  SAS was interested in the building, but in March, the airport manager, Harold Luesley, gave first refusal to the AFC.  The club moved in some time after the 1968 airshow.  Meetings were held in what is now the bar and lounge, and the garage continued by that name.

The winter of 1968-1969 was particularly cold, and the building needed a new furnace, which would cost $950. The clubroom needed curtains, and the floors need to be waxed.  Chairs were all to be labelled as belonging to AFC, but this did not actually happen until 1970, when they were given out on loan to the municipality. In early 1969 the Air Rangers were given permission to use the building for their meetings. And a janitor was hired at a cost of $12/month.

Up to 1970, the clubhouse was used by the Matsqui Police as a communications centre during the airshows, and from 1971 it became the base for handling airshow cash.  Before that, a workbee had been organized to clean up the garage, and it was estimated that $400 would pay for it to be remodelled.

Airport buildings did not originally have electricity meters installed, but naturally, they became required as buildings were leased. The club took until 1971 to have a meter installed.

The original 1968 rationale was that the building would cost about $1,050/year, and the membership dues were fixed at $15 on the basis that with 70 members they would pay the cost of the building. In fact the total costs, including the lease, property tax, janitor, insurance, utilities and renovations turned out much higher – $2,041 in 1969, and rising to $3,856 in 1979 .  A discussion in Jan 1978 re-affirmed the concept that annual dues should cover the costs of the clubhouse, and the 1979 financial statement does show 100 members each paying dues of $30, plus 15 new members who each paid $60 initiation, for a total dues revenue of $3,900.

The renovations and new facilities included a shuffle-board and a cigarette machine for the lounge in 1971. The exterior was painted in 1972.  The fireplace was built in 1975    In 1973 the garage renovation was still just a plan, and its estimate was now $1,000. The kitchen was renovated in 1976, and new chairs purchased. A patio door was installed in 1977, a patio was built, and a horseshow pit created.  1978 saw new curtains, and new carpets in the washrooms, and necessary renovations were estimated at $7k to $8k with the roof as a priority. A new sign was installed outside in 1979, the exterior was painted again, and 12 cedar trees were planted around the patio. In November the meeting room (formerly the garage) was renamed in honour of Butch Merrick.

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The club’s affluence and acquisition of assets (aircraft, cash and clubhouse), its steady income from the airshow, and its hugely subsidized flying and social possibilities, were enviable things. They were generally perceived as having been built up over the years by the dedication and work of members who had developed the airshow from nothing to its recognized international status. Membership was valuable, and from 1968 on, this spawned a number of developments and trends.

Previously, anyone wishing to join the club simply had to complete the application and pay the dues. From 1968, applicants were first required to attend an interview with the entire executive, who then decided on the merits their application. They were then required to pay an initiation fee, in addition to their annual dues. The initiation fee was considered a buy-in to the assets that had already been accumulated by the members. For 1968 the annual dues were $10 and the initiation fee was $15. By 1976 they were $20 and $30, and in 1979 they were $30 and $60 respectively.  It also took time and effort for a new member to work into the full privileges of membership. The effort was the volunteer work required to help produce the airshow – without enough volunteer hours a member could not qualify for the next year’s flying incentive.  The time element was reflected in the hourly rates for club aircraft being higher for newer members, and also in that new members could not qualify for the flying incentive until they had been a member in good standing for one year.  Good standing also required attendance at general meetings, with only a limited number allowed to be missed. In 1973 six of the meetings could be missed, and this was reduced to three for 1974.  In time a bylaw amendment fixed the attendance requirement at two thirds of the general meetings. Even so, meeting attendance was often very low. Sign-in sheets were introduced in 1972, and again in 1973.  From 1974 a roll was called at every general meeting, and members would be fined 25c for lateness or not wearing their name badge. The roll call and fines were started again in 1977.

There was a sense in which the existing members did not want to offer membership too easily to new applicants, and also a sense that membership should not be shared with too many people. This gave rise to the first suggestions of limiting the membership numbers — that 75 might be a good place to stop.  The membership roll had been fairly stable around 70 to 80 members for some years, but it started to grow, and in 1976 a decision was made to limit the roll to 100. This prompted the need to examine exactly who was on the roll, who had paid their dues, and who was in good standing. The result showed a total list of 120, but some members were considered as not being active in the club. However, it took until late 1977 to settle on a list of names to be struck from the roll. In the meantime, new members were admitted quite regularly anyway, despite the agreed cap of 100. In fact, there was a motion in Nov 1976 to raise the cap to 125, but it was defeated. At the same time, the new policy naturally created the need for a waiting list. Applicants could be interviewed and approved, but they could not become a member until a place opened up. They also had to pay a $40 application fee, which would be credited to their account when they were admitted.  It should be noted that the membership cap never achieved the status of being a bylaw – it was simply an agreed policy. However, it was taken seriously in subsequent years, and it wagged a bylaw into existence, which greatly affected the dynamics of membership.

In particular, it created the need for a new grade of member – Associate Members, and a bylaw was approved in Oct 1977. The new membership grade was intended to accommodate airshow volunteers, and those on the waiting list to become full members. At that time, the membership roll had been pared down to 102 names, and there was a significant waiting list (already 19 names in Feb).  The first step transferred 7 names from full membership to associate membership. These were members who were no longer flying or active (or not very much), and were deemed to no longer need the benefits of full membership – or who the club no longer needed as full members. This opened up seven places for those on the waiting list. The executive took active control from here on, regularly dropping members, specifically choosing who to admit from those on the waiting list, and rejecting some applicants when interviewed. In Feb 1978 eight more members were dropped from the roll, eight replacements were chosen from those on the waiting list, and two new applicants were rejected. The expectation of associate members was that they should be active in the club, while waiting patiently for a full membership slot to open. In 1979 they were given name badges.

In May of 1979 the executive looked at whether the membership cap could be removed, and there was a proposal to raise the cap to 115, but this did not happen.  In spite of the cap remaining in place, in 1979, a total of 37 new members were admitted and 16 new associate members. The cap had brought some rigour to the task of maintaining the membership roll; but it had created a need for significant administrative effort; it must have caused the loss of many members; and it had created two classes of member – those with all the privileges, and those without.

While considering membership classes, we should also mention Life Members. The first was John Spronk. When Skyway Air Services closed their flight training operation at Abbotsford in early 1969, John’s position as CFI ended. He was soon offered a position with Pacific Western Airlines, and this required a move to Edmonton. His contributions had been central to the development and success of both the flying club and the airshow, and in recognition of this, he was made a Life Member of the club. Perhaps the expectation was that his would be a permanent departure, but after two years in Edmonton acquiring all the necessary ratings and seniority, he was able to move back to Abbotsford and to the club.  In 1973 there was some discussion regarding his right to vote as a Life member, but his status and privileges were, of course, confirmed.

The second Life Member was Butch Merrick, and this decision happened in May of 1976. He was presented with a plaque in November. Butch was a founding member of the club, holding Membership Card Number One,  and had made huge contributions of volunteer effort to both the club and the airshow. Unfortunately, he died suddenly in January 1979, and later that year the club’s meeting room was named in his honour.

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Throughout this whole period, the fly-outs, fly-ins, socials, banquets, dances, general meetings, work bees, committee meetings, and airshow activities, etc etc continued unabated.  And the club supported a number of worthy community causes.

The club had organized the airshow preview event in June of 1968. It was a good month for a fly-in, and in time, Father’s Day fly-ins would become a regular event, with pancake breakfasts and spot landing and flour bombing contests. Butch Merrick was always on hand to organize the food. In early 1974, John Spronk was planning for the fly-ins to include an annual air race, but that particular idea was abandoned by April.

Fly-out participation was high; encouraged by the flying incentive and low hourly rates. Crossing the US border was less inconvenient than it is now. A total of 108 people planned to make the trip to Renton in April 1968; using four aircraft, a number of cars, and a bus.  US flyouts also included Roche Harbor, Blakely Island, and Olympia.  More frequent trips were made to destinations in BC.  In addition to the organized fly-outs, Sunday mornings became the time to show up at 8.30am, and then launch on spontaneous fly-outs to wherever seemed like a good destination at the time. In May of 1973 there was even a motion that the club aircraft be specially reserved for this every Sunday morning, but it was defeated. Perhaps they didn’t really need to fly-out anyway – at one point in 1974 Butch Merrick was cooking breakfast regularly every Sunday, for whoever was there at the club.

Not every social, banquet or dance was well attended, and sometimes they were a net cost to the club. The issue of beer in the clubhouse appears in the minutes a number of times. In 1969 it was decided that the club needed a liquor licence for its Saturday night events.  At one time it was decided that the bar would only be open on meeting nights. At another, it was decided that there would be no alcohol allowed in the meetings and that the bar would be closed during meetings. The bar was always an honour system, and more than once there was a shortfall from the funds that should have been there, which in 1974 resulted in a decision that beer should be discontinued.

The club maintained its community relations by sponsoring organisations such as the Air Cadets, and events like Miss Abbotsford. The Miss Abbotsford competition was a longstanding annual commitment. Various local organisations, the club included, sponsored a girl to enter, paying for her expenses. The club entries always visited the club to meet members. The eventual competition winners were treated as celebrities at the airshow every year. Numerous deserving groups were taken for airplane rides at the clubs expense, these included the St John’s Ambulance members, a Junior Hockey team, Job’s Daughters, airshow volunteers, and trainees from the Wildwood Training Centre. In 1968, members had to be reminded to not make commitments on behalf of the club, such as free rides. The club also provided bursaries for students at Selkirk College, BC Vocational Institute, and Trinity Western.

 

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A B C D
1 How many terms as President did John Spronk serve? 1 1 2 3 4
2 What year were the trees (the hedge) planted behind the club? 2 1968 1942 1979 1991
3 How many trees were there originally? 3 32 24 12 6
4 How many trees are there now? 4 32 24 12 6
5 What year did John Spronk become the club’s first Life Member? 5 1961 1967 1969 1979
6 Who was the second Life Member? 6 King Hussien Don Nikkel Butch Merrick Gordy Cockriell
7 To whom was the club’s first Cessna 172 (VBU) eventually sold? 7 Bob McFarland Lucky Hooieveid Wayne Cave Dick Heke
8 Who was the first Manager hired to run the airshow administration? 8 Doris Matthews Ron Thornber Ian Smith Harold Luesley
9 Who was Treasurer for 1966-67 ? 9 Doris Mathews Sid Collins Sandy Bazen John Mor
10 By 1979, how many aircraft had the club purchased? 10 3 4 5 6
11 How many aircraft did the club still own in December 1979? 11 1 2 3 4
12 What was the membership cap number agreed in 1976? 12 75 100 125 150
13 What year was the grade of Associate Member introduced? 13 1962 1968 1976 1979
14 From 1968, how many airshow directors were appointed by the AFC? 14 7 14 21 28
15 What was the name of the annual payment made by the airshow to the club? 15 Campground Payment Sponsor Dividend Production Grant Investor’s Payback
A B C D
16 Which club members were not expected to volunteer with the airshow? 16 Directors Women None Members in good standing
17 What was the name of the payment made to members who flew rented aircraft? 17 Flying Incentive Flying Subsidy Renter’s Subsudy Pilot’s Payback
18 What type was the first aircraft considered for purchase by the club in 1968? 18 Cessna 150 J3 Cub Cessna 172 Champion
19 In 1969, how many different aircraft hourly rates were charged to members on the basis of seniority? 19 2 3 4 5
20 What was the name of the first civilian flight training unit at Abbotsford? 20 Skyway Air Services Sumas Air Service Abbotsford Air Services Coastal Pacific Aviation
21 What year was the Short Stranraer flying boat rebuild finished at Aerovive? 21 1970 1962 1967 1975
22 What year did the Golden Centennaires perform at the airshow? 22 1958 1967 1971 1978
23 What year did the Golden Hawks come to Abbotsford? 23 1958 1961 1967 1973
24 When was the fireplace completed in the clubhouse lounge? 24 1969 1963 1973 1978
25 What was the original purpose of the building we use as a clubhouse? 25 Mess Hall Fire Hall Guard House Officers’ Club
26 How many original wartime buildings are still standing at the airport? 26 3 4 5 6
27 In which building was the original Terminal, which came into operations after the airport was transferred to civilian use? 27 Building 1 Building 2 Building 3 Building 33
28 In what year did Lady Baden Powell hold a Girl Guide Rally at the airport? 28 1948 1956 1966 1972
29 In 1979, what were the club’s annual dues, and what was the initiation fee? 29 $10 and $20 $20 and $60 $30 and $30 $15 and $25
30 Who was Miss Abbotsford in 1967? 30 Gloria Swanson Carol Sim Linda Swanson Lana Turner
A B C D
31 Who flew Miss America at the airshow in 1970? 31 Bob Hoover Captain America Bud Granley Dib Dibnah
32 Who opened the airshow in 1974? 32 Richard Nixon Pierre Trudeau Hussein bin Talal Ayatollah Khomeni
33 What year in the 1960’s was there no RCAF presence at the airshow? 33 1998 1964 1967 1969
34 Who is best credited with inventing the now common term City of Abbotsford? 34 George Ferguson Henry Braun Chuck Dennet Matthew Begbie
35 Where were the first airshows in what is now the City of Abbotsford? 35 RCAF Abbotsford Parajump centre Lundstrom Farm Mill Lake Park
36 How many Founding Members were there? 36 10 17 25 40
37 Who is currently the second most senior member of the club? 37 Millie Watson Murray Webb John Pawlovich Don Richardson
38 In what year was Conair formed? 38 1969 1971 1973 1975
39 Who was the first DoT Airport Manager at Abbotsford 39 Phil Gaglardi Harold Luesley George Miller Harold Porter
40 What was registration of the aircraft bought by the club in 1977 40 VBU CBO HXT IEV
41 Where was the inaugural meeting of the AFC? 41 Building 2 Armouries Abbotsford Air Services Fire Hall
42 What year did the RAF send two Belfasts to transport the Short Stranraer back to UK? 42 1962 1970 1975 1986
43 What was the name of Art Scholl’s dog? 43 Elevator Snoopy Aileron Deadweight
44 How was the airshow billed in 1965? 44 Abbotsford Air Show Rotary Air Show Centennial Air Show Abbotsford International Air Show
45 How many days was the 1964 airshow? 45 1 2 3 4
46 What was the club’s purchase price for HXT? before tax 46 $8,500 $10,750 $11,250 $16,800
47 From what year was the AFC President required to be an airshow director? 47 1962 1967 1969 1975
48 What year was the first extention to what was then runway 06-24? 48 1945 1958 1970 1981
49 What was the last year that John Spronk performed in the airshow? 49 1966 1969 1974 1979
50 Which club member was part of the Canadian skydiving team for the 1964 world championships? 50 Hank Hamm Doris Giles Dave Giles Doris Matthews

 

Lise Ash joining Give Hope Wings again!

Our very own Lise Ash is once again joining Give Hope Wings for another adventure.

In June 2021 there will be a coast to coast expedition. Please click this link for more details

https://givehopewings.ca/2021-expedition

Give Hope Wings Coast to Coast 2021

Give Hope Wings Coast to Coast 2021

CTV Toronto has uploaded the story about Lee & Marilyn and Hope Air/Give Hope Wings:

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/canadian-charity-provides-the-gift-of-flight-for-those-in-need-1.5124425

(TORONTO – August 6, 2020) A group of pilots is organizing a fundraiser to help Hope Air – a charity that provides free flights and accommodations to patients in financial need – by flying across Northern Ontario and Quebec this fall to raise thousands of dollars.

The Give Hope Wings expedition runs from September 30 to October 4 and aims to raise $100,000 to provide 400 flights to help people in need who must travel hours away for surgeries and appointments. Their expedition will also raise awareness for people in Northern Ontario and Quebec in need of help. Flights are especially important for patients who live in Northern Ontario and Quebec who would have to drive or take a bus for several hours each way to reach specialists. Last year, Hope Air provided more than 13,000 travel arrangements to help Canadians. To date, previous expeditions have raised a total of $770,000 to fund more than 3,000 flights.

For this third annual expedition, the pilots will take off in Burlington, fly to Sault Ste. Marie and then stop in Timmins and Sudbury. They will then fly east to Quebec City and across the Saguenay River. Hope Air will hold media events in Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins and Sudbury with social-distancing measures in place and local patients will be available for media to interview.

Lee Arsenault loves to fly over the skies of Ontario and volunteers with Hope Air to fly patients. He’s leading the pilots on this expedition to help others. “I remember flying a child in Sudbury that was five months old but only weighed 10 lbs. due to birth complications. I will never forget how appreciative this young mother was for a free flight. It is moments like this that make our missions flying patients so rewarding.”

“Thousands of families are helped every year through our work, and we want to continue and help even more people. This expedition is an opportunity for us to do so,” said Mark Rubinstein, the CEO of Hope Air.
Hope Air is also recruiting for additional pilots who are interested in joining the expedition. More information is available at givehopewings.ca. Those who are interested in donating can visit here.

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About Hope Air
Hope Air is Canada’s only national charity providing free travel and accommodations for Canadians in financial need who must access medical care far from home. Since its inception in 1986, Hope Air has provided more than 150,000 travel arrangements for patients regardless of age or medical need.

For people living on a low income in small and rural communities, distance and cost are very real barriers to them accessing vital medical care. Hope Air is a unique and essential part of our Canadian healthcare system. Without the access Hope Air provides, our national system of universal healthcare coverage would fall short of its promise. Hope Air has been chosen as one of Canada’s best 100 charities by Maclean’s magazine, MoneySense magazine and Charity Intelligence based on efficiency, transparency and need.

For more information, visit hopeair.ca.

About Give Hope Wings
Give Hope Wings is the largest volunteer-led fundraiser in Hope Air history. A squadron of pilots circumnavigates different parts of the world to raise money for Hope Air and support Canadian patients who have to travel for medical care. There have been two expeditions to date: the South American Tour in 2019 and North-West Expedition in 2019. Give Hope Wings has raised a total of $770,000, providing more than 3,000 Hope Air medical access flights to patients in financial need with free travel to medical care far from home.

Airspace inefficiency being exposed due to lack of air traffic

AIRSPACE

Covid-19 has exposed the inefficiencies that exist in current airspace arrangements.

With air traffic at only 30%-40% of normal levels, flight distances in Europe have reduced by an

average of 30 miles1 with an overall route saving amounting to some 30,000 miles each day. For

example:

  • Edinburgh-Gatwick: 357 flight miles reduced to 322 (with a 304kg or 12% fuel saving).
  • Frankfurt-Heathrow 410 flight miles reduced to 380.
  • Brussels-Dublin 482 flight miles reduced to between 402 and 412.

While these savings occur when reduced traffic density permits more direct routing, what savings might be possible, even at full capacity? How can increasing numbers of urban air mobility flying machines and unmanned vehicles be absorbed in the future?

1https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/unfasten-your-seatbelts-weve-landed-early-thanks